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November 4, 2008
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Desert Biped by thomastapir Desert Biped by thomastapir
Though entirely mechanical in nature, this mech's organic design and styling indicate production by A.I. evolutionary simulators attempting to reproduce the biomechanical efficiency of living organisms. Originally, biomechanical design templates were limited to machines employed in the space war because the A.I. software responsible for their creation itself had foundations in 10-dimensional mathematical algorithms derived from Overculture hieroglyphs. Up until the outbreak of the Flea War, knowledge of XT artifacts was concealed from the terrestrial public to prevent the possibility of sociological contamination and culture shock. The A.I. evolutionary simulators represented such a radical leap forward in computer science that project heads were afraid they would confirm the rumors of SETA-derived technology if publically revealed. After the eruption of the Hellmouths, however, these concerns were rendered irrelevant and the existence of XT-derived technology was disclosed to the public. Such an engineering aesthetic thus places the mech either on Mars during the late Cydonia War or on Earth during the 22nd century, after declassified technology from the "space war" has finally trickled down to the private sector and is being applied towards weapons manufactured for deployment in the Flea War.
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:iconciradrak:
ciradrak Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2011
I know this is really sketchy, but it's one of my favorite concepts from a design point of view. It's like a robotec bird. Nice.
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:iconthomastapir:
thomastapir Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2011
Thanks very much, I'm happy you like it!
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:icondoodlebotbop:
Doodlebotbop Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2008  Hobbyist General Artist
Niiice.

I thought of something. Are there Fleas inthe ocean?
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:iconthomastapir:
thomastapir Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2008
There aren't! That may be one of the places the tech humans flee, like the orbiting space colonies. For the most part I picture the Flea War -era humans as so desperate and focused on trying to survive that they don't really pursue such a major undertaking, but I can see a few nations and private organizations moving underwater. Could open up possibilities in an RPG-type scenario for Repatriation Era allies when the extrasolar colonists return. Nuclear submarines may be some of the last holdouts against the Fleas, because they can stay submerged nearly indefinitely and could also strike from the surface.

It's also one of the reasons the returned colonists employ so many amphibious and submersible exploration mechs on Venus.
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:icondoodlebotbop:
Doodlebotbop Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2008  Hobbyist General Artist
yeah! That's why I asked, since you have that aquatic drone.

Would a high-powered firehose pump thing be able to deter a flea? Or do they just don't swim?
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:iconthomastapir:
thomastapir Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2008
They don't swim, and they can't breathe water--though there are Flea-like relatives that can survive in vacuum and/or in very low-oxygen environments (such as the lunar "spider crabs" and the Martian "sand fleas," though neither of these groups are very closely related to the terrestrial Fleas; there is also a branch of Flea-like organisms guarding a mothballed Overculture powerplant on Iapetus, one of the moons of Saturn).

I see where you're going with the "firehose" idea!--I don't think they would be repelled by the water itself, but any sufficient kinetic pressure should discourage them.

Another thing to keep in mind on 22nd/23rd century Venus is that even if they (the humans) don't have Fleas to contend with underwater, it is still a primordial planet covered by shallow seas presumably supporting aggressive marine life--that could lead to some interesting scenarios.
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:icondoodlebotbop:
Doodlebotbop Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2008  Hobbyist General Artist
Ooooh. Would said aggressive marine life eat fleas? I mean, like those giant crocodiles, waiting and if you run to eh water, ti will ignore you and go for the muc hbiggerpeice of prey? Could be a good tactic, but not nessesarily reliable XD

What wuld happen if Humanity tried to genetically engineer something to prey on the fleas?
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:iconthomastapir:
thomastapir Featured By Owner Nov 6, 2008
Those are some really interesting possibilities I wouldn't have considered myself!

My thinking is that the Fleas would probably be immune from wildlife attack by virtue of a biochemical signal that says either "Warning, Don't Attack" or "Not Edible." Kind of like a built-in shark repellant. I'm thinking they may not, in fact, BE edible, as they aren't naturally occurring creatures and may not have a suitable biochemistry for consumption.

I don't see humans genetically engineering counter-flea organisms for pscyho-/sociological reasons--they associate genetic manipulation with the Overculture, and want to avoid the "slippery slope" of becoming like them. The one exception is that during the early/mid Flea War era, there was a period during which the humans engineered toxic biological agents (nerve gas and poisons) to use against the Fleas. In response, the Fleas spontaneously developed toxic spores. The results were so disastrous (this is, in fact, what wiped out a large portion of terrestrial civilians in the early 22nd century) that the human nations outlawed the use of biological weapons.
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:icondoodlebotbop:
Doodlebotbop Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2008  Hobbyist General Artist
*rereads questions* My goodness I had a bad case of the typos there. My apologies.'

And I see! makes sense.
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:iconthomastapir:
thomastapir Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2008
Does it?? =P I'm never sure I'm making sense to anybody but myself!
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